Judge Rules Gay French and Moroccan Couple Can Marry

Picture via Passport

Picture via Passport

Binational same-sex couples in France can now marry thanks to the Court of Appeal that overturned a government agreement between France and 11 other nations. The appeal came when a French and Moroccan gay couple , Dominique and Mohammed, were refused a marriage license because Mohammed was a Moroccan citizen. According to the France24: “…nationals from 11 countries, including Morocco, Poland and Laos, were not allowed to marry people of the same sex in France…All 11 ban gay marriage and had signed agreements with France whereby a citizen [sic] in a binational couple must obey his or her own nation’s marriage law.” The court overruled the agreement with Morocco in a clever argument by the prosecution. According to GSN: “Lawyer Didier Besson…claim[ed] this was the first time a Moroccan and a French national has attempted to obtain a same-sex marriage license. The local court pointed out the wording of the French law contradicts the agreement, saying only one potential spouse needs to reside where the law allows the marriage. Due to the way the law is worded, it ‘implicitly but necessarily’ changes the situation and overrules the agreement between France and Morocco.” Although this is a big step for French and Moroccan couples, those couples in which one is from one of the other ten countries still can’t marry. This case, however, sets a strong precedence for future cases.
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