‘Nude in Public’ Exhibit at the Leslie and Lohman Museum Celebrates the Homoerotic Works of Sascha Schneider

Image via Leslie and Lohman Museum

Image via Leslie and Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art

Despite the evident homoeroticism in his rich works, painter Sascha Schneider (1870-1972) met major critical acclaim in the German art world during the late 19th and early 20th century. His detailed, classical renderings of male beauty through the nude form were highly lauded. Such bold paintings and lithographs of naked men highlighted the intricacies of the male muscular form and propelled an unabashed homoeroticized male image into the public sphere.

Today, however, though some occasionally recall his illustrations in Karl May’s German adventure novels, he has mostly been forgotten, even in his native country. But the Leslie and Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art‘s current exhibit “Nude In Public: Sascha Schneider—Home Eroticism and the Male Form circa 1900” showcases some of Schneider’s richest works, reminding the art world that the once celebrated Schneider is an artist to remember. Curated by Jonathon David Katz, the exhibit, which runs now until December 8, is also meant to spur a dialogue around the artwork that questions why such boldly homoerotic works were less controversial a century ago than they would be today.

 

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